Building Confidence to Capture Your Best Spring Photos

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Story and Photos by Nicholas Crawford

All photos taken on Samsung Galaxy Note 9 or a FujiFilm QuickSnap One Time Use Camera

Photography is undoubtedly one of the best ways to share your perspective of the world and create something to be proud of. It’s wholly unfortunate that in this modern age of social media and the internet, I still come across so many people devoid of the confidence to share their photography. The lack of any formal training or an expensive camera can often make would-be artists shy away from the process altogether. You definitely do not have to be a professional photographer to capture beautiful photos, especially during spring.

I’ll preface this by offering a bit of my background with photography. It has been a passion of mine since I was a young teenager. Although, I never considered anything I was doing to be artistic. It was mostly just capturing special moments on birthdays and holidays. That is, until college where I took two photography classes as electives during my second year. These classes did a lot for my technique but more importantly, they taught me how crucial it was to have the confidence to get out there and actually take pictures. Before I started working for Roulez Media, I freelanced as a portrait photographer any time I could. And now I get to take pictures every day.

So here is some advice on how to start capturing memories in a new and artistic way, not from a professional, but from someone with confidence and passion and for photography.

Don’t Worry About Your Camera

Any photographer worth their salt will tell you that the composition of a photo is exponentially more important than the camera you use. The phone you carry around in your pocket every day will do just fine.

It’s Okay to Trust AUTO

If you don’t feel comfortable adjusting your camera’s manual settings, don’t. You can normally trust the AUTO setting and there are plenty of places to learn the technical settings once you are more comfortable.

Look at Your Subject First

Note that the slight camera movement hides the unattractive dome on the right side of the top photo.

This can seem obvious, but it’s important. It’s important to not just see the subject of your photo through a lens or on a screen. Before you ever ready your camera, try to take a mental picture. Doing this will help you avoid photographic litter (unattractive aspects of an image like power lines and unsightly buildings.)

Think About the Light

Regardless of the camera, regardless of the photographer, bad lighting will result in a bad photo. Now, I don’t just mean the absence of light either. Of course, a harshly underexposed photo will probably leave your picture filled with unwanted noise, but an overexposed picture can leave your photo looking completely washed out.

Experiment

There are no right answers in photography. Sure, there are techniques that are commonly used to yield certain results, but photography is an art and art is subjective. Have fun with light, color, texture and composition.

Keep Your Confidence

It does not matter if you are a seasoned photographer or are using the camera app on your phone for the first time, if you take a picture, you are a photographer. If its something you enjoy and something you want to share then you owe it to yourself to get out there and take your best pictures.

On Instagram, tag @RoulezMedia in your best spring photos with the #RoulezSpringPhotoContest for a chance to win a photography feature article in Roulez Magazine.

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About Author

Nicholas is an all-around great guy and one of the nicest people you will ever meet. With his positive nature he inspires others forward to their goals. He is a graduate of Old Dominion University’s award winning film program where he served as editor for many of the department’s faculty/student co-productions. Independently, his work has been showcased in festivals all over the United States, Europe and Asia. Nicholas is passionate about fiction writing, editing and filmmaking. He recently edited, captured film and championed for Escaping Fed, a feature-length documentary film also by Roulez. He also currently serves as the Creative Director, Filmographer and Film Editor for Roulez Media.

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